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Classes

COURSE OFFERINGS


3-D Art - 10 Credits

Grades 9 - 12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (fine art)


ART I - 5 credits

Grades 9-12, 1 semester, no prerequisite, elective (fine art)

Art I gives students a broad scope of exposure to media and techniques, exploring the visual arts and artists. Emphasis is placed on learning the elements and basics of design and color through drawing and painting creative studio projects. The primary goals are to expand aesthetic awareness, assess and reflect on their own work and others', and develop skills, knowledge, and an appreciation of art as a means of communication and expression.


ART II - 5 credits

Grades 9-12, 1 semester, prerequisite Art I, elective (fine art)

Individualized projects dominate Art II. With demonstration and guidance, students explore the methods and techniques of acrylic painting and expanded color dominated themes. The exposure to and construction of 3-D Art may include: Clay, stained glass, wire, and collage.

*Additional fees may apply.


Computer Applications - 10 credits

Grade 9, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

Computer Applications is an introduction to the foremost Microsoft Office applications used in the business world. Applications include: Word processing with Word, spreadsheet creation and function using Excel, and creating visual aids for presentations using PowerPoint. Students are introduced to these programs through integration into everyday life situations.


English 9 - 10 credits

Grade 9, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

A language arts course where students primarily read and write about short stories, plays, and poetry to develop a sense of historical context and to acquire knowledge of applications in their own lives. Assignments include investigations of literary styles and devices, creative modeling, and written, auditory, oral, and visual analysis of material. Responsibility, beliefs, values, self-identity, and relationship are major themes of the course.


English I0 - 10 credits

Grade 10, 2 semesters, prerequisite English 9 required

A language arts course designed to help students increase in their reading and writing abilities. Strong emphasis is placed on writing skills including academic, creative, and poetry. Required reading focuses on world literature. Students learn to connect their reading and writing.


English 11 - 10 credits

Grade 11, 2 semesters, prerequisite English 10, required

A language arts course where students study American Literature to obtain a greater understanding of the American character, identify recurring themes, and apply them to their own lives. Writing instruction will include expository and argumentative analysis, research, narrative, and descriptive modes of discourse, focusing on effective communications and language skills.


English 12 - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, prerequisite English 11, required

A language arts course presented in a primarily chronological format, using various genres of world literature and focusing on language and literature as reflective of the human experience through the ages. Students will explore the historical and cultural currents and events that have influenced cultural development on a worldwide scale. Writing, research, and composition instruction is an ongoing aspect of the coursework, integrated with the instruction units presented. Students will expand writing abilities in all major forms of dis-course.


AP English 12, 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, in place of English 12 by teacher approval only

The course is primarily designed for students interested in studying and writing various kinds of analytic or persuasive essays on nonliterary topics with emphasis on language, rhetoric, and expository writing. Textbook reading and assignments, essays, specific novels and films, selected stories, poems, artwork, photographs, speeches and plays along with non-fiction selections, vocabulary, literary devices, and grammar studies, journals, and a wide variety of writing assignments, presentations, and test preparation will continue throughout the year. Teacher instruction and feedback, as well as peer editing are critical parts of the learning process. Performance expectations are high and the workload is challenging. A College Board certified AP examination will be given at the appointed time in May. Most colleges give credit for successful scores on the exam.


Spanish I - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

This course provides an opportunity to develop proficiency in the four basic skills: Listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural activities are also an important part of the course content.


Spanish II - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite Spanish I, elective

This course continues working to develop the skills begun in Spanish I. Skills in reading, listening, writing, and speaking remain the focus, with cultural activities also part of the content.


Speech - 5 credits

Grade 12, 1 semester, no prerequisite, required

Speech is a practical and general course designed for students to improve communication skills, speech proficiency, poise, and self-confidence in public speaking situations. The course is designed to develop better interpersonal communication skills and lead students step-by-step from simple to relatively complex original speaking presentations.


Publications - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, permission of instructor, elective (practical art)

The primary focus of this class is the production of school news releases, books, and the school yearbook (Syringa). Students will learn skills necessary in the production process including: layout, design, computer graphics, journalism, photography, ad sales, and fundraising.


Living Skills - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (practical art)

This course is designed to introduce students to essential skills in food preparation and preservation, nutrition and fitness, and wise consumer practices. It is based on Biblical principles of balance, moderation, and variety. Hands-on lab experiences are emphasized and consumer related field trips are provided.


Senior Project - 5 credits

Grade 12, required

The Senior Project is designed to help students develop or improve a skill or performance; design or create a product, service, system or event; and investigate a career or a passionate interest to better prepare them for service to others, further studies, and/or employment after high school. The final project must demonstrate a students ability to research, write, and interview, work with a mentor, present findings to an audience, and reflect on the experience. Seniors are expected to demonstrate self-directed learning by selecting a topic of genuine interest and managing their time well.


Algebra I - 10 credits

Grades 9-10, 2 semesters, prerequisite placement exam, required

A beginning Algebra course that covers such topics as polynomial factoring, exponents, roots, sets, graphing, problem solving, and elementary geometry. The course is designed to teach elementary Algebra with an emphasis on problem solving in preparation for Algebra II. Algebra I also offers adequate preparation for a comprehensive Geometry course.


Algebra II - 10 credits

Grades 10-11, 2 semesters, prerequisite Algebra I, required (if it is the second year of math)

This is the final course in beginning Algebra. In addition to further study of Algebra I topics, the student will study such topics as matrices, complex numbers, and trigonometry. Upon completion of this course, the student will be fully prepared for a Pre-Calculus course.


Pre-Calculus - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite Algebra II, elective

This course extends the topics learned in Algebra II. It includes in-depth coverage of such topics as polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric functions and equations, conic sections, series, polar coordinates, and introductory calculus. Graphing calculators are required and used extensively throughout this course. The emphasis is on problem solving and preparation for Calculus.


Calculus - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, prerequisite Pre-Calculus, elective

Advanced Placement Calculus AB is a high school course that teaches the topics of the first semester of college Calculus. Students will study a variety of topics including elementary functions, trigonometry, derivatives and their applications and an introduction to integrals. A College Board certified AP Examination will be given at the appointed time in May. Most colleges give credit for successful scores on the exam. Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be prepared for the second semester of college Calculus.


Consumer Math - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective

This course studies the fundamentals of mathematics. It emphasizes arithmetic proficiency and focuses on day-to-day real world math problems.


Geometry - 10 credits

Grades 10-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite Algebra I, elective or required if second year of math

This course is a comprehensive study in Euclidean Geometry. Topics include proofs, constructions, logic, trigonometry, triangles, circles, and polyhedra. The goal is to help the student develop an appreciation for the inherent beauty of geometry in our world.


Band - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite by audition, elective (fine art)

Band is an instrumental group open to intermediate and advanced students by audition. This group consists of woodwinds, brass, and percussion. Both sacred and secular music suited to the abilities of the members are performed around the Northwest as opportunities arise. Performances include the Christmas and Spring concerts, and area church concerts.


Choir - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite by audition, elective (fine art)

Chorale is a group of mixed voices open to all students committed to studying and performing choral music. Both sacred and secular music suited to the abilities of the members are performed around the Northwest as opportunities arise. Performances include Christmas and Spring Concerts, as well as area church concerts.


Instrument/Voice Lessons - 5 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (fine art)

Lessons offer instruction in vocal/instrumental and musical development with emphasis on technical improvements and repertoire. Students will participate in one recital each semester. Cost of lessons is $15.00 per lesson.


Music History - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (fine art)

A non-performance course that explores the elements and history of music. Students will have the opportunity to critically listen to representative works beginning with the Middle Ages and continuing through the 20th Century. The lives of iconic composers, musicians, and noteworthy individuals from the various periods of music history will be explored in detail.


Music Theory - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (fine art)

An introduction to the principles of harmony in music. Students will develop critical listening skills and a musical vocabulary. Topics will include, but not be limited to, the construction of major and minor scales, basic chord recognition, music notation, and basic four-part writing.


Piano Instruction - 5 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective (credit available by arrangement)

Lessons offer instruction in pianistic and musical development. Emphasis is on technique, theory, and interpretation structured to accommodate the beginning through advanced student. $15.00 per lesson.


Sound Ripple - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, elective

Sound Ripple is a handbell group open to all students. One doesnt need to be familiar with music in order to join. One does need to be committed and dedicated to the goals and purpose of this group. The Sound Ripple Choir performs locally and occasionally on a tour.


Soundwave - 10 credits

Grades 9-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite former experience and audition, elective (fine art)

Soundwave is a select group open by audition only. Advanced sacred and secular music is performed on a 5-octave set of Malmark English Handbells and three octaves of Malmark Handchimes. Each ringer must be dedicated to continuing the excellent reputation of this group as it performs in area churches, civic groups, and on tours throughout the Northwest and beyond.


Jazz Band - 2 credits

Grades 9-12, elective (fine art), 2 semesters, prerequisite by instructor approval

Jazz band is an instrumental group open to beginner and intermediate students by approval of the instructor. Students will learn the basic elements and techniques of jazz theory and performance. Extracurricular commitment is required. Traditional jazz instruments used in this course (i.e. saxophone, trombone, trumpet, piano, bass, electric guitar, drums & miscellaneous percussion).


Health - 5 credits

Grades 9, 1 semester, no prerequisite, required

Instruction in health is approached through the concept of wellness. This class is designed to give the students an awareness of all aspects of healthful living (mental, emotional, physical and spiritual), and to enable them to integrate this awareness into everyday life. The curriculum is designed to show that the student is responsible for his/her health. Em-phasis is placed to some degree on five dimensions of wellness: stress management, nutritional awareness, physical fitness, personal health and safety, and self-image. Current health issues are discussed regularly.


Physical Education I & II - 5/10 credits

Grade 9 - 10, semester/year, no prerequisite, required

The basic physical education classes are designed to introduce the students to a variety of abilities that can be used throughout their lives. These abilities include physical fitness, team sport skills, and social skills. The students will be able to design and execute their own personalized fitness programs by the completion of class. The students will be introduced to the fundamental skills, rules and team strategies for, (but not limited to), the following sports: flag football, volleyball, basketball, hockey, soccer, and softball. The students will also be introduced to the importance of social skills, including sportsmanship, with application to sports. The importance of being actively involved with some form of physical activity as a lifestyle is strongly emphasized.


Bible 9 - 10 credits

Grade 9, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

The first part of this course examines God's relationship with His people as found in the book of Genesis in the Old Testament. Both the historical and theological themes will be studied including: Creation, the antediluvian world, the flood, the call of Abraham, the stories of the patriarchs, and the migration of the Israelites to Egypt. The second part of this course examines the life and teachings of Jesus as found in Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John in the New Testament. The course consists of lectures, discussion, group activities and assignments. Bibles are required.


Bible 10 - 10 credits

Grade 10, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

Bible 10 examines the history of God's people from the time of Moses until the present day. Special emphasis is put on grace and how one can see it revealed especially in the events of the Old Testament, through the persecution of the early church, and through the time of the dark ages. One will see God's leading in the development of the Adventist church from small beginnings to the world wide movement of today. Bibles are required.


Bible 11 - 10 credits

Grade 11, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

This class examines the Biblical basis of Seventh-day Adventist doctrine so each student may give an answer for their hope in Christ, as directed by 1 Peter 3:15. During the first semester we study the prophetic books of Daniel and Revelation, giving a clearer understanding of several unique Seventh-day Adventist beliefs including the Heavenly Sanctuary, the investigative judgment, God's remnant church and their mission, and the second coming of Christ. During the second semester we continue our study by examining the rest of the 28 fundamental beliefs of the Seventh-day Adventist church. We also use this time to study the contrasting beliefs of other denominations, specifically Roman Catholic and Latter-day Saints. The purpose of the class is to give students the information they need to become strong and active members of the Seventh-day Adventist church. Bibles are required.


Bible 12 - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

This course provides the opportunity for seniors to develop a philosophy for practical, adult Christian living as taught in the Word of God. Subjuects include: A study of world religions, college and career investigation, personal finances, marriage and family and life philosophy and moral choices. Class activities include lecture, discussion, research, hands-on projects and simutaions. Bibles are required.


Anatomy and Physiology - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, prerequiste Biology I & Chemistry (with grade of C or above), elective

This course involves the study of the human body, the eleven body systems and how they function. The course will begin with an introduction of cell biology and will then take a detailed investigation of the body systems. The dissection of animals is expected of all students. A detailed examination of these structures adequately prepares the student for further studies in the field of health, nursing, and medicine. Labs include animal dissection, building the Visible Man model, and tissue observations. This class is an elective and only Seniors with a high proficiency in Science may take this course.


Biology I - 10 credits

Grade 10, 2 semesters, prerequisite 9th grade science class, required

This course is a study of life and its basic principles and structures from the molecular level to the organism. Major topics include: Chemistry, cells, cellular processes, genetics, ecology, creation/evolution, classification, and human biology. Labs range from experiments to field work to creating models.


Biology II - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, prerequiste Biology I (with grade of C or above), elective

This course is a study of life and its organisms. The various forms of life that will be studied include unicellular organisms through complex organisms. Major topics include: Protozoans, fungi, plants, invertebrate and vertebrate animals, marine biology, viruses, and reproduction & development. Labs cover most of the major topics. Labs range from experiments to field work to creating models. A journal of biological examples will be kept by each student. This class is an elective and only Seniors with a high proficiency in science may take this course.


Chemistry - 10 credits

Grade 11, 2 semesters, prerequisite 9th grade Science and Algebra I (grade of C or above), elective

This course is a study of elementary chemistry. Major topics fro this course include: Matter, energy, atomic structure, ionic compounds, covalent compounds, chemical equations, changes in matter, gas laws, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, reaction rates, and nuclear chemistry. In addition, students will get a strong understanding of the periodic table and how to use it. Labs cover most of the major topics.


Earth Science - 10 credits

Grade 9, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

This course is a broad study of earth and the universe. The instruction emphasizes everyday applications of earth science to man’s existence. Major topics include: Geology, which is earth’s materials, its sculpting forces, and its history; besides oceanography, meteorology, which is the weather, and astronomy, the study of space and its celestial bodies. Labs cover most of the major topics and range from experiments to field trips to creating models.


Physics - 10 credits

Grades 11-12, 2 semesters, prerequisite Algebra I (with grade of C or above), elective

This is an introductory physics course which covers the traditional topics of modern physics. Topics will be reinforced through a variety of lab experiences.


Economics - 5 credits

Grade 12, 1 semester, no prerequisite, required

Economics is a one semester course designed to introduce students to the concepts of economics. This course will explain what economics is and how it affects theories of supply and demand. It will enable students to begin understanding the personal, community, national, and global effects of economics. The course will allow students to explain basic principles of Christian stewardship, practical applications of those principles and the impact of the North American economy on the work of the SDA Church worldwide.


U.S. History - 10 credits

Grade 11, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

U.S. History focuses on allowing us to see the guiding hand of God in history, provides a Christian perspective on national events, and prepares students to be responsible citizens. It will assist students to be knowledgeable, think critically, and make responsible and informed choices. It is based on the development of events that occurred from the Pre-Columbus period to present events and challenges. Emphasis is placed on facts, concepts and skills that have applications in lifelong learning and allow understanding of the political, social, and cultural changes that have happened.


U.S. Government - 10 credits

Grade 12, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

U.S .Government is designed to provide a Christian perspective on national events, and prepare students to be responsible citizens. This class addresses the course of America's political development and institutions and will assist students to be knowledgeable, think critically, and make responsible and informed choices. The course will lead to an appreciation of their function, rights, and responsibilities as citizens in a democratic society.


World History - 10 credits

Grade 10, 2 semesters, no prerequisite, required

The focus of World History is to allow us to see the guiding hand of God in history, provide a Christian perspective on world events, and prepare students to be responsible citizens. It will assist students to be knowledgeable, think critically, and make responsible and informed choices. World History is based on an understanding of events that occurred from the Beginning to present world events and challenges. Emphasis is placed on facts, concepts, and skills that have applications in lifelong learning and allow understanding of the political, social, and cultural changes that have happened.


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